November 2016 Newsletter - Arthritis, Autoimmunity and Aging
#1
If you don't have a copy of the newsletter, or would like to subscribe, please PM me.


Quote:Arthritis, Autoimmunity, & Aging

For several decades it has been known that
women are from 2 to 10 times more likely than
men to be affected by an autoimmune disease,
such as rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus
erythematosis, SLE, and that the incidence of
autoimmune disease increases with aging. Most
physicians believe that autoimmune diseases are
chronic and progressive, and that, on average, they
shorten life by several years. It's very common for
an autoimmune disease in one organ to be associated
with an autoimmune problem in one or more
other organs. The incidence of heart disease and
several types of cancer is higher in people with
SLE or rheumatoid arthritis.

According to the National Institutes of Health,
23.5 million people in the US suffer from an
autoimmune disease, based on studies of 24 different
"autoimmune diseases." The NIH says that the
prevalence IS increasing; it has recently been
called "an epidemic" and an "explosion." Many
researchers have listed from 80 to more than 100
diseases that they consider to be "autoimmune."

...

Since the 1950s, it has been recognized that
antibodies produced by B cells are central to the
autoimmune process. With aging and stress, the
regulatory thymus gland shrinks (from about 3 5
grams around puberty to about 5 grams at age 70),
while the more stable B cells are maintained at
about the same level, or even increased. Without a 
functioning thymus, the antibodies bound to
antigenic material become a problem (for example
activating mast cells and platelets), rather than
being just part of a corrective process.

Current therapies reduce inflammation by
eliminating one or more components of the B cell
antibody system. The reduced inflammation can
permit some restorative processes to work, but the
drugs aren't curative. A more biological approach
would be to reduce exposure to the factors that
damage the thymus or over-excite the B cells.
Some of the factors that cause atrophy of the
thymus gland include cortisol and other glucocorticoid
hormones, estrogen, prostaglandins, polyunsaturated
fatty acids, lipid peroxidation, nitric
oxide, endotoxin, hypoglycemia, and ionizing
radiation. Progesterone and thyroid hormone
support restoration of the thymus gland, providing
protection by opposing all of those agents of
atrophy. An increase of sugar in the diet can
correct some of the metabolic changes of aging
(Missios, et al., 2014). Proliferating thymic cells
are energized by sugar, their senescence is
activated by fat metabolism.

Drugs that are currently used with some
success for treating diseases that aren't thought of
as "autoimmune," such as memantine used in
Alzheimer's disease, will probably be useful in the
"autoimmune diseases," that is, in diseases that
involve estrogen and inflammation, including
cancer. 

Newsletter club anyone? Please feel free to post ideas, comments, inspirations of your own?
My avatar: William Blake, Vision of Strength
[img]http://i.imgur.com/7sD2Hod.jpg[/img]
#2
(12-26-2016, 10:02 PM)VoS Wrote: If you don't have a copy of the newsletter, or would like to subscribe, please PM me.


Quote:Arthritis, Autoimmunity, & Aging

Progesterone and thyroid hormone
support restoration of the thymus gland, providing
protection by opposing all of those agents of
atrophy. An increase of sugar in the diet can
correct some of the metabolic changes of aging
(Missios, et al., 2014). 
I think I may need to clarify this with Ray. I've sent him the email, below.

From what I can see, thyroid hormone supplements can actually shrink the thymus when there is a lack of other nutrients, such as magnesium or B12 (as there is likely to be).

Also, for many people, it's not clear that sugar in the diet will correct the metabolic changes of aging. For many, as they age, sugar (alone) only makes things worse, because many people lack the insulin or potassium to use the sugar effectively, and also tend to eat too much of the long chain fatty acids. 

I think, in these likely circumstances of aging, the sugar is more likely to get deposited as harmful belly fat, or get fermented in glycolysis, or generate poisonous byproducts.

But Ray has long written about coconut oil and ketones in the diet, and fruit juice, which can can correct the metabolic changes of aging, safely. He's pointed out for a long time now that ketones and nutrient rich juice allow fruit sugar in the diet to be used effectively, and also allow the liver to store and supply glucose to the organs as needed -- such as the thymus. 

Quote:[Email to Ray] 

This attached study from 1944 seems to support your view, and Selye's, of the thymus. It found the thymus undergoes "accidental involution" only in response to suboptimal diets, and castration and adrenalectomy only prevented atrophy from suboptimal diet. 
http://press.endocrine.org/doi/abs/10.12...lCode=endo

In 1980, Kendall et al, reached a similar conclusion, but found that the thymus does not shrink or disappear so much as turn into a yellowish adipose tissue of roughly the same size but lesser density:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/article...1-0111.pdf

Kendall also suggests, at page 496, that the thymus may be especially sensitive to unsaturated fatty acids. 

Others have suggested that nutrients such as B12 may prevent involution of the thymus even under great stress. 
http://press.endocrine.org/doi/abs/10.12...lCode=endo

Do you know of any studies of actually regenerating the atrophied thymus? I see that parabiosis does not seem to work, though implantation may work. 
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4481326/

Even as early as 1904, Henderson showed that regrowth also does occur with castration. 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1465586/

I am experimenting with high dose urea therapy, urea paste, and high levels of inhaled CO2. It's interesting that CO2 and urea both pass freely through the cell membrane and effectively dehydrate the cell. Both are said to be "excreted" but really they are both eliminated too quickly and almost always deficient.

Danopoulos found that it was hard to deliver urea to any organ other than the liver, because it was eliminated too quickly.  He also found that creatine hydrate seemed to slow the elimination of urea. 
http://www.encognitive.com/node/2698.
UPDATE: I got this answer back from Ray:
Quote:I have read such reports (of thymus regenerated by thyroid and progesterone), but doubt that they would be available on the internet, though Google is gradually increasing access to non-medical science. In our hamster lab, we noticed that the hamsters didn’t have thymus glands, just a little string of fat in its place, during the winter months, but in the spring and summer I never saw one without a firm, well formed gland. The lab was on a constant 12-12 hour light-dark cycle, with constant temperature. 

From this, I take it that regeneration of the thymus could be a result of the morphogenetic field theory that Ray describes here:
http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/stemcells.shtml
My avatar: William Blake, Vision of Strength
[img]http://i.imgur.com/7sD2Hod.jpg[/img]
#3
Very interesting, always like your posts man, thanks!
#4
(12-26-2016, 10:27 PM)VoS Wrote:
(12-26-2016, 10:02 PM)VoS Wrote: If you don't have a copy of the newsletter, or would like to subscribe, please PM me.


Quote:Arthritis, Autoimmunity, & Aging

Progesterone and thyroid hormone
support restoration of the thymus gland, providing
protection by opposing all of those agents of
atrophy. An increase of sugar in the diet can
correct some of the metabolic changes of aging
(Missios, et al., 2014). 
I think I may need to clarify this with Ray. I've sent him the email, below.

From what I can see, thyroid hormone supplements can actually shrink the thymus when there is a lack of other nutrients, such as magnesium or B12 (as there is likely to be).

Also, for many people, it's not clear that sugar in the diet will correct the metabolic changes of aging. For many, as they age, sugar (alone) only makes things worse, because many people lack the insulin or potassium to use the sugar effectively, and also tend to eat too much of the long chain fatty acids. 

I think, in these likely circumstances of aging, the sugar is more likely to get deposited as harmful belly fat, or get fermented in glycolysis, or generate poisonous byproducts.

But Ray has long written about coconut oil and ketones in the diet, and fruit juice, which can can correct the metabolic changes of aging, safely. He's pointed out for a long time now that ketones and nutrient rich juice allow fruit sugar in the diet to be used effectively, and also allow the liver to store and supply glucose to the organs as needed -- such as the thymus. 

Quote:[Email to Ray] 

This attached study from 1944 seems to support your view, and Selye's, of the thymus. It found the thymus undergoes "accidental involution" only in response to suboptimal diets, and castration and adrenalectomy only prevented atrophy from suboptimal diet. 
http://press.endocrine.org/doi/abs/10.12...lCode=endo

In 1980, Kendall et al, reached a similar conclusion, but found that the thymus does not shrink or disappear so much as turn into a yellowish adipose tissue of roughly the same size but lesser density:
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/article...1-0111.pdf

Kendall also suggests, at page 496, that the thymus may be especially sensitive to unsaturated fatty acids. 

Others have suggested that nutrients such as B12 may prevent involution of the thymus even under great stress. 
http://press.endocrine.org/doi/abs/10.12...lCode=endo

Do you know of any studies of actually regenerating the atrophied thymus? I see that parabiosis does not seem to work, though implantation may work. 
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4481326/

Even as early as 1904, Henderson showed that regrowth also does occur with castration. 

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1465586/

I am experimenting with high dose urea therapy, urea paste, and high levels of inhaled CO2. It's interesting that CO2 and urea both pass freely through the cell membrane and effectively dehydrate the cell. Both are said to be "excreted" but really they are both eliminated too quickly and almost always deficient.

Danopoulos found that it was hard to deliver urea to any organ other than the liver, because it was eliminated too quickly.  He also found that creatine hydrate seemed to slow the elimination of urea. 
http://www.encognitive.com/node/2698.
UPDATE: I got this answer back from Ray:
Quote:I have read such reports (of thymus regenerated by thyroid and progesterone), but doubt that they would be available on the internet, though Google is gradually increasing access to non-medical science. In our hamster lab, we noticed that the hamsters didn’t have thymus glands, just a little string of fat in its place, during the winter months, but in the spring and summer I never saw one without a firm, well formed gland. The lab was on a constant 12-12 hour light-dark cycle, with constant temperature. 

From this, I take it that regeneration of the thymus could be a result of the morphogenetic field theory that Ray describes here:
http://raypeat.com/articles/articles/stemcells.shtml
Excellent.
[color=#222222][size=medium]"I have no religion, no political affiliation: I believe in me, above everything else." -Chasing Good & Evil[/size][/color]
#5
Is it ok to share Ray's newsletter without people paying the meagre 20 bucks they need to pay for a year's worth (6) of newsletters?

What you say about sugar is quite contradictory with Ray's views in some aspects, so you think plain white sugar or fructose powder can actually be harmful? You seem to suggest decent amounts of saturated fats would help (coconut oil, ketones).

If one tries to avoid starch , then fruit juices and milk aside getting the bulk of one's calories is impossible unless one eats quite high in fat or table sugar/fructose powder.
#6
(01-03-2017, 04:01 PM)Wagner83 Wrote: Is it ok to share Ray's newsletter without people paying the meagre 20 bucks they need to pay for a year's worth (6) of newsletters?

What you say about sugar is quite contradictory with Ray's views in some aspects, so you think plain white sugar or fructose powder can actually be harmful? You seem to suggest decent amounts of saturated fats would help (coconut oil, ketones).

If one tries to avoid starch , then  fruit juices and milk aside getting the bulk of one's calories is impossible unless one eats quite high in fat or table sugar/fructose powder.
Yes, a typical diet of nutritional ketones would have about 60% of calories from MCT, 20% from fruit juice, and 20% from high quality protein. For me high quality protein would be eggs or fermented dairy or collagen hydrolysate. I use high dose urea therapy to supplement my nitrogen levels. 

I think Ray would not disagree that an excess of sugar and long chain fatty acids is likely to lead to the deposition of bellyfat, especially for those who already have bellyfat. A few tablespoons of coconut oil may be OK, because it contains more than 50% medium chain fatty acids. In general, an adequate balance of ketones from MCT is protective against bellyfat deposition and insulin resistance.

I think Ray's newsletter subscription is $28 for 12 issues. The newsletters are sent every two months. For me, the best way to convey the value of Ray's newsletter is to share it privately, and to discuss excerpts, as I am doing here. 

I think the policy of the other forum is wrong or even illegal under US law, because Ray's newsletters are posted publicly there in their entirety, without Ray's explicit permission in advance.
My avatar: William Blake, Vision of Strength
[img]http://i.imgur.com/7sD2Hod.jpg[/img]
#7
(01-03-2017, 04:36 PM)VoS Wrote:
(01-03-2017, 04:01 PM)Wagner83 Wrote: Is it ok to share Ray's newsletter without people paying the meagre 20 bucks they need to pay for a year's worth (6) of newsletters?

What you say about sugar is quite contradictory with Ray's views in some aspects, so you think plain white sugar or fructose powder can actually be harmful? You seem to suggest decent amounts of saturated fats would help (coconut oil, ketones).

If one tries to avoid starch , then  fruit juices and milk aside getting the bulk of one's calories is impossible unless one eats quite high in fat or table sugar/fructose powder.
Yes, a typical diet of nutritional ketones would have about 60% of calories from MCT, 20% from fruit juice, and 20% from high quality protein. For me high quality protein would be eggs or fermented dairy or collagen hydrolysate. I use high dose urea therapy to supplement my nitrogen levels. 

I think Ray would not disagree that an excess of sugar and long chain fatty acids is likely to lead to the deposition of bellyfat, especially for those who already have bellyfat. A few tablespoons of coconut oil may be OK, because it contains more than 50% medium chain fatty acids. In general, an adequate balance of ketones from MCT is protective against bellyfat deposition and insulin resistance.

I think Ray's newsletter subscription is $28 for 12 issues. The newsletters are sent every two months. For me, the best way to convey the value of Ray's newsletter is to share it privately, and to discuss excerpts, as I am doing here. 

I think the policy of the other forum is wrong or even illegal under US law, because Ray's newsletters are posted publicly there in their entirety, without Ray's explicit permission in advance.

So does that mean you rely on fat as burning fuel? What is your mct source, coconut oil?

Ok so are you saying Ray is against white sugar / fructose powder in rather large amounts? (think 100-150 grams per day) ? Afaik it's only glucose and fructose so balanced with saturated fats , proteins and nutrients it should be ok. I mean rice does not offer much more than white sugar, except starch and perhaps longer lasting energy.

That makes sense.
#8
(01-04-2017, 03:19 PM)Wagner83 Wrote:
(01-03-2017, 04:36 PM)VoS Wrote:
(01-03-2017, 04:01 PM)Wagner83 Wrote: Is it ok to share Ray's newsletter without people paying the meagre 20 bucks they need to pay for a year's worth (6) of newsletters?

What you say about sugar is quite contradictory with Ray's views in some aspects, so you think plain white sugar or fructose powder can actually be harmful? You seem to suggest decent amounts of saturated fats would help (coconut oil, ketones).

If one tries to avoid starch , then  fruit juices and milk aside getting the bulk of one's calories is impossible unless one eats quite high in fat or table sugar/fructose powder.
Yes, a typical diet of nutritional ketones would have about 60% of calories from MCT, 20% from fruit juice, and 20% from high quality protein. For me high quality protein would be eggs or fermented dairy or collagen hydrolysate. I use high dose urea therapy to supplement my nitrogen levels. 

I think Ray would not disagree that an excess of sugar and long chain fatty acids is likely to lead to the deposition of bellyfat, especially for those who already have bellyfat. A few tablespoons of coconut oil may be OK, because it contains more than 50% medium chain fatty acids. In general, an adequate balance of ketones from MCT is protective against bellyfat deposition and insulin resistance.

I think Ray's newsletter subscription is $28 for 12 issues. The newsletters are sent every two months. For me, the best way to convey the value of Ray's newsletter is to share it privately, and to discuss excerpts, as I am doing here. 

I think the policy of the other forum is wrong or even illegal under US law, because Ray's newsletters are posted publicly there in their entirety, without Ray's explicit permission in advance.

So does that mean you rely on fat as burning fuel? What is your mct source, coconut oil?

Ok so are you saying Ray is against white sugar / fructose powder in rather large amounts? (think 100-150 grams per day) ? Afaik it's only glucose and fructose so balanced with saturated fats , proteins and nutrients it should be ok. I mean rice does not offer much more than white sugar, except starch and perhaps longer lasting energy.

That makes sense.
From my experience many people have bellyfat.  You can also see over on the other forum that many people there get bellyfat. Some say they have added 20 pounds or more. The reason is they are eating too much of both sugar and long chain fatty acids, in butter, ice cream, dairy, desserts, fatty meat or gravy, and many other typical fats. 

Some of the members also seem to think that adding bellyfat is OK, as long as they are eating what they think is a "Ray Peat diet". They think they are improving their overall metabolic health, even though they are adding bellyfat. This is what they think. 

But it is just a kind of meme on that forum that is very harmful to the members there. Charlie Mathers, for example, has said that he is quite fat, and has rotting teeth and impotence, and perhaps other diseases.

Adding bellyfat really is not OK. And Ray Peat has never said that it is. 

An increase in bellyfat is highly correlated with an increased likelihood of developing diseases such as fatty liver, visceral inflammation, insulin resistance, and even excessive adrenal hormones.

The medium chain fatty acids protect against the deposition of belly fat and the correlated diseases. One pure, inexpensive source of medium chain fatty acids is Medium Chain Triglycerides, which is usually referred to as MCT oil. 

I think a low fat diet may also do more harm than good, unless you are very sedentary or monitor your blood sugar very closely. Even a little bit of exertion on a low fat diet can cause you to run out of sugar quickly, and go into a stress reaction. The stress reaction will cause insulin to decrease, and make sugar unavailable to your cells. You may then start converting muscle tissue to survive.

If you test for low blood sugar, you can see for yourself that the stress reaction can be avoided with a good supply of medium chain fatty acids. All the major organs prefer to use medium chain fatty acids as long as they are available.
My avatar: William Blake, Vision of Strength
[img]http://i.imgur.com/7sD2Hod.jpg[/img]
#9
(01-04-2017, 05:20 PM)VoS Wrote:
(01-04-2017, 03:19 PM)Wagner83 Wrote:
(01-03-2017, 04:36 PM)VoS Wrote:
(01-03-2017, 04:01 PM)Wagner83 Wrote: Is it ok to share Ray's newsletter without people paying the meagre 20 bucks they need to pay for a year's worth (6) of newsletters?

What you say about sugar is quite contradictory with Ray's views in some aspects, so you think plain white sugar or fructose powder can actually be harmful? You seem to suggest decent amounts of saturated fats would help (coconut oil, ketones).

If one tries to avoid starch , then  fruit juices and milk aside getting the bulk of one's calories is impossible unless one eats quite high in fat or table sugar/fructose powder.
Yes, a typical diet of nutritional ketones would have about 60% of calories from MCT, 20% from fruit juice, and 20% from high quality protein. For me high quality protein would be eggs or fermented dairy or collagen hydrolysate. I use high dose urea therapy to supplement my nitrogen levels. 

I think Ray would not disagree that an excess of sugar and long chain fatty acids is likely to lead to the deposition of bellyfat, especially for those who already have bellyfat. A few tablespoons of coconut oil may be OK, because it contains more than 50% medium chain fatty acids. In general, an adequate balance of ketones from MCT is protective against bellyfat deposition and insulin resistance.

I think Ray's newsletter subscription is $28 for 12 issues. The newsletters are sent every two months. For me, the best way to convey the value of Ray's newsletter is to share it privately, and to discuss excerpts, as I am doing here. 

I think the policy of the other forum is wrong or even illegal under US law, because Ray's newsletters are posted publicly there in their entirety, without Ray's explicit permission in advance.

So does that mean you rely on fat as burning fuel? What is your mct source, coconut oil?

Ok so are you saying Ray is against white sugar / fructose powder in rather large amounts? (think 100-150 grams per day) ? Afaik it's only glucose and fructose so balanced with saturated fats , proteins and nutrients it should be ok. I mean rice does not offer much more than white sugar, except starch and perhaps longer lasting energy.

That makes sense.
From my experience many people have bellyfat.  You can also see over on the other forum that many people there get bellyfat. Some say they have added 20 pounds or more. The reason is they are eating too much of both sugar and long chain fatty acids, in butter, ice cream, dairy, desserts, fatty meat or gravy, and many other typical fats. 

Some of the members also seem to think that adding bellyfat is OK, as long as they are eating what they think is a "Ray Peat diet". They think they are improving their overall metabolic health, even though they are adding bellyfat. This is what they think. 

But it is just a kind of meme on that forum that is very harmful to the members there. Charlie Mathers, for example, has said that he is quite fat, and has rotting teeth and impotence, and perhaps other diseases.

Adding bellyfat really is not OK. And Ray Peat has never said that it is. 

An increase in bellyfat is highly correlated with an increased likelihood of developing diseases such as fatty liver, visceral inflammation, insulin resistance, and even excessive adrenal hormones.

The medium chain fatty acids protect against the deposition of belly fat and the correlated diseases. One pure, inexpensive source of medium chain fatty acids is Medium Chain Triglycerides, which is usually referred to as MCT oil. 

I think a low fat diet may also do more harm than good, unless you are very sedentary or monitor your blood sugar very closely. Even a little bit of exertion on a low fat diet can cause you to run out of sugar quickly, and go into a stress reaction. The stress reaction will cause insulin to decrease, and make sugar unavailable to your cells. You may then start converting muscle tissue to survive.

If you test for low blood sugar, you can see for yourself that the stress reaction can be avoided with a good supply of medium chain fatty acids. All the major organs prefer to use medium chain fatty acids as long as they are available.

Ok, I guess you are not a fan of Mcdougall then. There have been studies showing cancer feed on fat and PUFA depletion can be achieved with a no fat diet. I'm not necessarily a fan of such an approach though.
Despite being lean starch seems to make all the fat accumulate as belly fat, I'm pretty sure anything that impairs digestion can contribute to that through estrogens.

What changes have you noticed since applying some of Ray's work into your diet, and then switching to MCT oil as a main source of calories? Curious about brain, sexual and physica function.
#10
(01-05-2017, 12:23 PM)Wagner83 Wrote:
(01-04-2017, 05:20 PM)VoS Wrote:
(01-04-2017, 03:19 PM)Wagner83 Wrote:
(01-03-2017, 04:36 PM)VoS Wrote:
(01-03-2017, 04:01 PM)Wagner83 Wrote: Is it ok to share Ray's newsletter without people paying the meagre 20 bucks they need to pay for a year's worth (6) of newsletters?

What you say about sugar is quite contradictory with Ray's views in some aspects, so you think plain white sugar or fructose powder can actually be harmful? You seem to suggest decent amounts of saturated fats would help (coconut oil, ketones).

If one tries to avoid starch , then  fruit juices and milk aside getting the bulk of one's calories is impossible unless one eats quite high in fat or table sugar/fructose powder.
Yes, a typical diet of nutritional ketones would have about 60% of calories from MCT, 20% from fruit juice, and 20% from high quality protein. For me high quality protein would be eggs or fermented dairy or collagen hydrolysate. I use high dose urea therapy to supplement my nitrogen levels. 

I think Ray would not disagree that an excess of sugar and long chain fatty acids is likely to lead to the deposition of bellyfat, especially for those who already have bellyfat. A few tablespoons of coconut oil may be OK, because it contains more than 50% medium chain fatty acids. In general, an adequate balance of ketones from MCT is protective against bellyfat deposition and insulin resistance.

I think Ray's newsletter subscription is $28 for 12 issues. The newsletters are sent every two months. For me, the best way to convey the value of Ray's newsletter is to share it privately, and to discuss excerpts, as I am doing here. 

I think the policy of the other forum is wrong or even illegal under US law, because Ray's newsletters are posted publicly there in their entirety, without Ray's explicit permission in advance.

So does that mean you rely on fat as burning fuel? What is your mct source, coconut oil?

Ok so are you saying Ray is against white sugar / fructose powder in rather large amounts? (think 100-150 grams per day) ? Afaik it's only glucose and fructose so balanced with saturated fats , proteins and nutrients it should be ok. I mean rice does not offer much more than white sugar, except starch and perhaps longer lasting energy.

That makes sense.
From my experience many people have bellyfat.  You can also see over on the other forum that many people there get bellyfat. Some say they have added 20 pounds or more. The reason is they are eating too much of both sugar and long chain fatty acids, in butter, ice cream, dairy, desserts, fatty meat or gravy, and many other typical fats. 

Some of the members also seem to think that adding bellyfat is OK, as long as they are eating what they think is a "Ray Peat diet". They think they are improving their overall metabolic health, even though they are adding bellyfat. This is what they think. 

But it is just a kind of meme on that forum that is very harmful to the members there. Charlie Mathers, for example, has said that he is quite fat, and has rotting teeth and impotence, and perhaps other diseases.

Adding bellyfat really is not OK. And Ray Peat has never said that it is. 

An increase in bellyfat is highly correlated with an increased likelihood of developing diseases such as fatty liver, visceral inflammation, insulin resistance, and even excessive adrenal hormones.

The medium chain fatty acids protect against the deposition of belly fat and the correlated diseases. One pure, inexpensive source of medium chain fatty acids is Medium Chain Triglycerides, which is usually referred to as MCT oil. 

I think a low fat diet may also do more harm than good, unless you are very sedentary or monitor your blood sugar very closely. Even a little bit of exertion on a low fat diet can cause you to run out of sugar quickly, and go into a stress reaction. The stress reaction will cause insulin to decrease, and make sugar unavailable to your cells. You may then start converting muscle tissue to survive.

If you test for low blood sugar, you can see for yourself that the stress reaction can be avoided with a good supply of medium chain fatty acids. All the major organs prefer to use medium chain fatty acids as long as they are available.

Ok, I guess you are not a fan of Mcdougall then. There have been studies showing cancer feed on fat and PUFA depletion can be achieved with a no fat diet. I'm not necessarily a fan of such an approach though.
Despite being lean starch seems to make all the fat accumulate as belly fat, I'm pretty sure anything that impairs digestion can contribute to that through estrogens.

What changes have you noticed since applying some of Ray's work into your diet, and then switching to MCT oil as a main source of calories? Curious about brain, sexual and physica function.

I'm always experimenting and changing things around. Lately, I've gone to 60 grams a day of high quality protein from eggs, fermented dairy and collagen, and high urea doses of about 60 grams a day. 

On a ketone and juice diet, I eat about 150 grams of MCT and 200 grams of sugar from juices. And lately, a couple ounces of coconut milk (Jennifer's suggestion).

I think thermogenesis can be observed, the feeling of being warm even when it's cold. I think a slowing of the rate of breathing can be observed, too. 

The other physical function I check for is visceral fat or bloating around the belly, and the absence of bellyfat. From what I can tell, the very large membrane of the gut controls the brain and its many functions, including sleep, stress, sex, and endurance.

But the membrane of the gut, which is very large and only a few cells thick, seems to be very sensitive to swelling or edema.  I've been experimenting with urea in order to balance or reduce excess water.
My avatar: William Blake, Vision of Strength
[img]http://i.imgur.com/7sD2Hod.jpg[/img]
  


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread Author Replies Views Last Post
  September 2016 Newsletter VoS 0 1,820 10-25-2016, 06:40 AM
Last Post: VoS

Forum Jump: