Buteyko vs Peat: Heart pulse
#1
[Image: Buteyko_Table_Health_Zones.bmp]
Here is the Buteyko Table of Health Zones.

Not very Peaty isn't it, since Ray advises to have a pulse of 80bpm.
#2
(11-07-2016, 01:05 AM)Arborescence Wrote: [Image: Buteyko_Table_Health_Zones.bmp]
Here is the Buteyko Table of Health Zones.

Not very Peaty isn't it, since Ray advises to have a pulse of 80bpm.

I think they are describing different states. Ray Peat describes a body that is active. The yogi state seems to involve a voluntary lowering of the heart beat, as if you are diving underwater. It's sometimes called the diving reflex

I have both an 80 pulse when active, and a roughly 60 pulse when I breathhold for 120-150 seconds. Other breathholders or yogi practitioners I know of do as well.
#3
So when you are activte, will your breathing frequency and pulse increase as well?
#4
(11-08-2016, 12:57 AM)Arborescence Wrote: So when you are activte, will your breathing frequency and pulse increase as well?

Yes, when I'm active I find I do breath more, and tend to have a pulse of about 80. Even when active, I try to reduce breathing frequency, and do very shallow breathing, as much as I can. 

When I'm holding my breath for longer periods, as if diving underwater, I notice that my pulse will drop to roughly 60.

I think pulse rate is not a helpful indicator of metabolic health because it tends to vary quite a bit depending on the circumstances. I also don't rely too much on body temperature, because it tends to vary quite a bit, too.

I measure things like keeping body temperature up in cold water without shivering (more is better), the difference between diastolic and systolic blood pressure (more is better), reaction time (less is better), slow wave sleep (more is better), and my breathing depth and frequency (less is better).
#5
Morning pulse and temp is a reliable indicator in most situations. That's why Barnes and Peat use it as one of their main tools.
#6
(11-08-2016, 01:21 AM)RayPeatFan Wrote: Morning pulse and temp is a reliable indicator in most situations. That's why Barnes and Peat use it as one of their main tools.

Yes, I suppose it may be "possible to separate some of the effects of stress", by measuring temperature and pulse rate at different times of the day. This is what Ray Peat says in his article on the topic.
Quote:By watching the temperature and pulse rate at different times of day, especially before and after meals, it's possible to separate some of the effects of stress from the thyroid-dependent, relatively “basal” metabolic rate. 

But for me, there are too many effects of stress, which I find occur in diurnal cycles every 90 minutes, and are very difficult for me to separate out.

It also becomes a burden for me to keep measuring all the time, especially when thermometers tend be off by 1.5 degrees

I find in my own experiments that the more accurate, practical ways are the ones I've mentioned. And the easiest of those are slow, shallow breathing and a very clean gut, with no bloating or putrefaction.
  


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