Honey, The Forgotten Food
#1
It looks like humans were probably consuming pure sugar for a lot longer than low carb promoters would have people believe, and likely for the entire history of our species:

"In Paraguay, for example, the Ache believe honey is the second most important food in their diet, after game meat; honey can provide an Ache with more than 1,100 calories per day. Honey can constitute 80 percent of the calories consumed by the Efe pygmy people of the Congo and 15 percent of the diet of the Hadza of Tanzania. Furthermore, people go to great lengths to get honey. The Hadza often follow honeyguide birds to hives of stinging bees. The honey hunters then burn brush near the entrance of the beehive to smoke out the bees, who become confused and disarmed by the smoke. In Nepal, honey collectors climb bamboo ladders positioned on cliff faces to access nests tucked away in crevices. Ancient art verifies that honey consumption is not a recent phenomenon. Rock art depicting honeycombs, swarms of bees and honey collecting date to as many as 40,000 years ago. Such art has been found in Africa, Europe, Asia and Australia."

(http://www.smithsonianmag.com/science-na...s-9760262/)

"As a modern analogue, Pringle points to the hunter-gatherer society of the Hadza people, a culture in eastern Africa that “prize honey above all else in their diet.” This preference for honey has lead the Hadza hunters to develop a symbiotic relationship with a local bird species know as the greater honeyguide. Pringle says,

The bird dines almost entirely on beeswax and bee larvae, but it needs help to crack open hives. So the honeyguide calls to both honey badgers and Hadza hunters. When human hunters whistle back, the bird gradually leads the men by call-and-response song to the nearest colony."

(http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news...50/?no-ist)

"The work, by evolutionary biologist Claire Spottiswoode and her collaborators, “is the first to provide clear and direct evidence that honeyguides respond to specialized human signals … and that the birds associate those signals with potential benefits,” says John Thompson, an evolutionary biologist at the University of California, Santa Cruz. “The honeyguide literally understands what the human is saying,” adds Stuart West, an evolutionary biologist at the University of Oxford in the United Kingdom. “It suggests that the honeyguide and human behavior have coevolved in response to each other.”"

(http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2016/07/u...ts-thought)

"While most animals are wired to flee from human presence, the Greater Honeyguide embraces it. But how do the birds learn to work with people? Spottiswoode’s theory is that the behavior is innate. Because the chicks are reared by alternative species (hoopoes, kingfishers, scimitarbills, you name it), they can’t learn this highly unusual behavior from their parents. So, instead, the birds must inherit the knowledge, refining it to match their locale as they mature. In Tanzania, for example, the cue is a whistle; in Zambia, the sound of chopping wood draws them near, she says."

"More recently, Spottiswoode has been focused on studying the kinder side of the honeyguide. As adults, the pink-billed birds live up to their name, leading local hunters to wild beehives stashed in the cavities of baobabs and other tall trees. The men then scale the trunks, smash the hives, and make off with the sticky riches, leaving the wax and the calorie-rich larvae within for their partners in crime. (The Greater Honeyguide is one of few avians that can eat and digest wax.) It’s what scientists call a mutualistic interaction, and for the Yao community in Mozambique, where Spottiswoode carried out her newest research, honey plays a vital role in their daily lives."

"The human-honeyguide alliance was first documented in the 1500s, but some experts believe it might stretch back to Homo erectus, which would put it at about 1.9 million years old. Today, the Yao villagers are keeping the tradition alive. Though brrr-hm is their preferred trigger, Spottiswoode says that the type of sound may be largely arbitrary. It's the meaning that matters."

(http://www.audubon.org/news/meet-greater...nds-humans)
"The true method of knowledge is experiment." -William Blake
#2
(07-12-2017, 12:29 AM)Sea Wrote: It looks like humans were probably consuming pure sugar for a lot longer than low carb promoters would have people believe:

"As a modern analogue, Pringle points to the hunter-gatherer society of the Hadza people, a culture in eastern Africa that “prize honey above all else in their diet.” This preference for honey has lead the Hadza hunters to develop a symbiotic relationship with a local bird species know as the greater honeyguide. Pringle says,

The bird dines almost entirely on beeswax and bee larvae, but it needs help to crack open hives. So the honeyguide calls to both honey badgers and Hadza hunters. When human hunters whistle back, the bird gradually leads the men by call-and-response song to the nearest colony."

(http://www.smithsonianmag.com/smart-news...50/?no-ist)
Wow, a civilization I'd never heard of with 50,000 years of experience to refine their habits. What a potential treasure trove of health info.
#3
Good post! Honey and all bee products have tremendous nutritional value.
#4
Do they? Besides the sugar, what does honey actually provide us? I have heard of large amounts of the trace mineral boron. Also the antiseptic/antimicrobial properties of honey. What else?

Also has anyone here actually tried consuming large amounts of honey for long times?
  


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