Sinusitis, breathing and wheat + dairy
#21
(05-29-2017, 02:01 PM)Jennifer Wrote: I haven't seen Ray's comment about it being equivalent to glass, but I wouldn't be surprised if he did say that. He said this in the 2/15/2013 KMUD interview:

"…people taking supplements should be very careful to avoid anything with particles such as titanium dioxide or silica. […] And those things getting into the bloodstream trigger the stress hormones, and obesity is the least of the things they contribute to."

The last time I used horsetail and nettle, I noticed my teeth whitened, my skin softened and ridging I had in my nails went away, but I can't be sure it was the herbs because I had also changed my diet around the same time. Since I've been eating a fruit based diet since 2015, I figured I'd be able to isolate if those positive effects were a result of the herbs.

Ok thanks that sounds like rather positive effect and you should be able to tell if it has any negative ones before being harmed.

Quote:This is the functional alps article I came across:

http://www.functionalps.com/blog/2011/10/22/3169/

I think the main issue is particle size, and that's why I've never understood how well cooked starch could cause persorption issues. I've experimented with mixing cornstarch and some water in a pan and letting it come to a boil. It turned into a translucent, gelatin like mass. Well, imagine tapioca pearls. I just can't see how that would pose a persorption issue.

Did you consume mostly low-fat or full-fat dairy on your Peatish diet? I handled low-fat milk better than full-fat. With full-fat, I not only got the rash but I started getting the tiny pustules, gallbladder pains and sloshing gut. I asked Ray about this and he replied "Too much cream makes milk hard for some people to digest, so I usually recommend 1% fat milk, and low-fat cheeses, such as cottage cheese or mozzarella."


Thanks for the link. DO you think the fact it's gelatin-like matters? I saw it just had to do with the starch molecules themselves , I don't know if texture plays a part in how it is digested, I mean I'd still expect the body to get the glucose from it so everything is dissolved? Probably talking out of my ass here. Heart

Quote:Well, in fairness to Ray and his advice, I came to the diet with some major handicaps. I won't bore you with the details, but let's just say my body was in very rough shape.

That's really interesting about your grandfather. Thanks for sharing. My 92 year old grandmother often talks about how she and her siblings ate nothing but meals of mashed potatoes while growing up during the Depression. To this day, she loves her potatoes. Westside PUFAs would be proud. lol

Yep, my doctor had me tested for those. With my latest blood work, she ordered a total of 40 tests.

I love mine too, but any other ones than those I found (very wacky) do not work at all. I hope to have access to it year round. They are organic and come from Egypt, pretty stupid to not be able to buy local products but that's how things are.

OK great news!
#22
Wagner83 Wrote:Thanks for the link. DO you think the fact it's gelatin-like matters? I saw it just had to do with the starch molecules themselves , I don't know if texture plays a part in how it is digested, I mean I'd still expect the body to get the glucose from it so everything is dissolved? Probably talking out of my ass here.  Heart

Haha! No, I believe you have a valid point. I had the same line of thinking. What I was attempting to see with my lame experiment (lol) was if the addition of water and heat would cause the starch molecules to swell and weaken their crystalline structure/change their solubility, which was what I thought one of the main concerns was when it comes to starch and persorption. I also wonder what stomach acid and amylase do to starch's crystalline structure and its solubility and if those who produce more of them are less at risk. I don't know. I think I'm the one talking out of my bum now. Yikes! Big Grin


Wagner83 Wrote:I love mine too, but any other ones than those I found (very wacky) do not work at all. I hope to have access to it year round. They are organic and come from Egypt, pretty stupid to not be able to buy local products but that's how things are.

Do you know the name of the variety? I'm curious if they're similar to the creamer potatoes I tolerated.
"One regret, my dear world, that I am determined not to have when I am lying on my deathbed is that I did not kiss you enough." ~ Hafiz
#23
Okay, I just did a quick Google search and came across this. It's what I was attempting to understand:

http://digitalcommons.unl.edu/cgi/viewco...sciefacpub
"One regret, my dear world, that I am determined not to have when I am lying on my deathbed is that I did not kiss you enough." ~ Hafiz
#24
(06-03-2017, 01:58 AM)Jennifer Wrote: Haha! No, I believe you have a valid point. I had the same line of thinking. What I was attempting to see with my lame experiment (lol) was if the addition of water and heat would cause the starch molecules to swell and weaken their crystalline structure/change their solubility, which was what I thought one of the main concerns was when it comes to starch and persorption. I also wonder what stomach acid and amylase do to starch's crystalline structure and its solubility and if those who produce more of them are less at risk. I don't know. I think I'm the one talking out of my bum now. Yikes! Big Grin



Do you know the name of the variety? I'm curious if they're similar to the creamer potatoes I tolerated.

That reminds me of the paper on wacky potatoes I posted before. Thanks for the link.
Do we ever consume starch heated with less than 70-80 celsus degrees though?

Almost all the granules were irreversibly disrupted at or before 80 °C.

"Annabelle" or "princess" (those were truly fanstatic, dark yellow etc..) , organic from Egypt, the "Annabelle" I have access to locally are not good at all (floury despite how they advertise for it).

I've tried some green broths a few times with the herb you suggested (lightly boiled for 10-15 mn with a lid) and I'm not sure yet but it feels allergenic, not sure why it would be. I used parsley, basil (on its own) and coriander. Do you know if eating the herbs (as in a salad or seasoning) yield all the vitamins and minerals?
#25
Wagner83 Wrote:That reminds me of the paper on wacky potatoes I posted before. Thanks for the link.
Do we ever consume starch heated with less than 70-80 celsus degrees though?

Almost all the granules were irreversibly disrupted at or before 80 °C.

Not that I can think of. Boiling, baking, steaming, stewing and frying would be above 80 degrees C. Even the low-temp cooking method sous-vide uses temps slightly above 80 degrees C for root vegetables. I'm not sure about grains, though.

Wagner83 Wrote:"Annabelle" or "princess" (those were truly fanstatic, dark yellow etc..) , organic from Egypt, the "Annabelle" I have access to locally are not good at all (floury despite how they advertise for it).

I've tried some green broths a few times with the herb you suggested (lightly boiled for 10-15 mn with a lid) and I'm not sure yet but it feels allergenic, not sure why it would be. I used parsley, basil (on its own) and coriander. Do you know if eating the herbs (as in a salad or seasoning) yield all the vitamins and minerals?

Thanks. I googled them and the Princess variety does look really good. It looks similar to the creamers I used to eat, except much larger.

Coriander is a chelator so maybe you're reacting to it, or maybe it's the basil? I personally only use basil as a seasoning because I find it too strong as a concentrate. It numbs my tongue and leaves a dry mouth feeling, maybe from the oxalates? You could try mixing other herbs with milder leafy greens like baby kale and see if you still get an allergic reaction?

I'm not sure if eating the herbs raw in salads will yield you the same amount of nutrients as cooking them since your body would have to breakdown fiber/cellulose to get at the vitamins and minerals, but some vitamins are degraded with heat so you may gain there from eating them raw. Though, I know you were wanting to use the concentrate mainly as a calcium source. 

I actually don't cook my herbs. I make my concentrate by soaking the herbs for a few days in a glass jar with some distilled water, then pressing out the juice with a hydraulic juice press.
"One regret, my dear world, that I am determined not to have when I am lying on my deathbed is that I did not kiss you enough." ~ Hafiz
#26
(06-05-2017, 03:59 PM)Jennifer Wrote: Not that I can think of. Boiling, baking, steaming, stewing and frying would be above 80 degrees C. Even the low-temp cooking method sous-vide uses temps slightly above 80 degrees C for root vegetables. I'm not sure about grains, though.


Thanks. I googled them and the Princess variety does look really good. It looks similar to the creamers I used to eat, except much larger.

Coriander is a chelator so maybe you're reacting to it, or maybe it's the basil? I personally only use basil as a seasoning because I find it too strong as a concentrate. It numbs my tongue and leaves a dry mouth feeling, maybe from the oxalates? You could try mixing other herbs with milder leafy greens like baby kale and see if you still get an allergic reaction?

I'm not sure if eating the herbs raw in salads will yield you the same amount of nutrients as cooking them since your body would have to breakdown fiber/cellulose to get at the vitamins and minerals, but some vitamins are degraded with heat so you may gain there from eating them raw. Though, I know you were wanting to use the concentrate mainly as a calcium source. 

I actually don't cook my herbs. I make my concentrate by soaking the herbs for a few days in a glass jar with some distilled water, then pressing out the juice with a hydraulic juice press.

So that would be an advantage to Ray's point, a theoretical one at least.

Yes the taste was excellent too, I wondered if there was slightly more fructose, something in between potatoes and sweet potatoes.

I had exactly that reaction of numb tongue and weird dry mouth feeling! It could be the oxalates I did not think about it.

Not only calcium, if I can get a lot of vitamin A and maybe one or two other things and combine it with some brewer's yeast or liver for B vitamins and minerals it would be great. Otherwise vitamin A would have to come from a supplement or more liver (iron).

Ok !

I forgot about your question on milk and dairy, I ate high fat cheese like parmiggiano regigano (I suspect high histamines  from most cheeses, even not hard ones) or comté (yummm), but milk was 1.5 % , I tried full fat non high temperature pasteurized goat milk but it tasted awful and had bad effects. An other 2.5% homogenized goat milk with sodium citrate added to it used to treat me better (still got backne), now that I cut back on dairy I got very angry last time I drank it..
  


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