Social isolation
#1
I remember in one of his books that Ray talks about something he calls the "person effect", if I remember well it is manifested by reduced heartbeat and maybe (not sure) activation of the parasympathetic system when you see another person.

Does it mean that being around/with other people reduces metabolism/increases serotonin?

I went through a period of complete social isolation for the last week (often live as a recluse but not that extreme) and have noticed I become way more sharper and can concentrate a lot more on the things I like, and am interested in and can become more introspective, like if I had more dopamine in my brain.

What do you think about it? I hate being around others more and more as I don't find anyone interesting and I find that they are all brainwashed/conditioned/judgemental/treacherous and coercive/annoying. I prefer to be alone or buy a pet to have some company as I now most social relationships are pointless. I remember that haidut posted something on RPF saying that being alone even if you don't feel solitude is bad for health?
#2
i think your instincts are right. I believe there is an energy transmittance happening between human beings in proximity and a healthy person transmits a positive energy and an unhealthy person sends a negative one. I've met many people in health care and they give the impression of having been drug down into the muck.

It should be uplifting being around young people, but I believe toxic food additives like iron and unchecked estrogenic influences can make that just as negative as being around sick people.
#3
Yeah I think there are very few people that could provide "positive" energy. Charles Bukowski use to suggest to people who are feeling down to lock themselves up for three days. He would come out "totally enlightened" and in good mood everytime.
#4
(02-27-2017, 05:49 PM)mahounie Wrote: Yeah I think there are very few people that could provide "positive" energy. Charles Bukowski use to suggest to people who are feeling down to lock themselves up for three days. He would come out "totally enlightened" and in good mood everytime.

Well, yes, but Bukowski loved cats, no? And spent a good part of his life in bars? We should probably ask our resident expert here, our own Bukowski

Myself, I feel positive energy when I'm around people who tend I think to have high metabolic rates. Warm hands, warm heart. 

The danger for me arises in being trapped or "helpless" with typically older people who are authoritarian. Cold as ice. And yes, there, I do try to leave myself an exit at all times.
My avatar: William Blake, Vision of Strength
[img]http://i.imgur.com/7sD2Hod.jpg[/img]
#5
We live in a slave society so i prefer to remove myself from it as often as possible. At least when it comes to school and work, viz. places where indoctrination and slavery prevail. We're told that if we dont have a constant social life, we're mentally unsound, but in fact it's the opposite. If i cant have meaningful interactions with people i dont fuck with them. There is a lulling magnetism to the crowd, the herd, but you need to be consci9us of it. People are drawn to answers and certainty, so they find what makee them liked, for forget what makes them them. I worship conflict in the sense that you can't be 100% comfortable and really shine as a person. I try to do good, but id rather be excluded from the group than included. The world is one big Jonestown.
[color=#222222][size=medium]"I have no religion, no political affiliation: I believe in me, above everything else." -Chasing Good & Evil[/size][/color]
#6
(02-27-2017, 08:58 PM)ChasingGoodandEvil Wrote: We live in a slave society so i prefer to remove myself from it as often as possible. At least when it comes to school and work, viz. places where indoctrination and slavery prevail. We're told that if we dont have a constant social life, we're mentally unsound, but in fact it's the opposite. If i cant have meaningful interactions with people i dont fuck with them. There is a lulling magnetism to the crowd, the herd, but you need to be consci9us of it. People are drawn to answers and certainty, so they find what makee them liked, for forget what makes them them. I worship conflict in the sense that you can't be 100% comfortable and really shine as a person. I try to do good, but id rather be excluded from the group than included. The world is one big Jonestown.
Accurate info here. The present is a pretty cool time though. I doubt our group of thinkers would be allowed to live in many past societies.
#7
(02-28-2017, 01:41 AM)sm1693 Wrote:
(02-27-2017, 08:58 PM)ChasingGoodandEvil Wrote: We live in a slave society so i prefer to remove myself from it as often as possible. At least when it comes to school and work, viz. places where indoctrination and slavery prevail. We're told that if we dont have a constant social life, we're mentally unsound, but in fact it's the opposite. If i cant have meaningful interactions with people i dont fuck with them. There is a lulling magnetism to the crowd, the herd, but you need to be consci9us of it. People are drawn to answers and certainty, so they find what makee them liked, for forget what makes them them. I worship conflict in the sense that you can't be 100% comfortable and really shine as a person. I try to do good, but id rather be excluded from the group than included. The world is one big Jonestown.
Accurate info here. The present is a pretty cool time though. I doubt our group of thinkers would be allowed to live in many past societies.
That is absolutely true! Astutely said. Sometimes i forget. We would of definitely had a hard time in the past, probably burned at the stake or tortured in dungeons.
[color=#222222][size=medium]"I have no religion, no political affiliation: I believe in me, above everything else." -Chasing Good & Evil[/size][/color]
#8
Solitude can be important for reflection but I would say it is detrimental to your health. Having an outside perspective from another human being would reinforce vitality.

Our species is governed by a co-operation/competition dynamic. It would benefit to be less pessimistic about others in order to engage them. Not everyone has to know about Ray Peat (et al.) in order to be considered valid for communication and connection. In fact, I would say that is a toxic mentality to have.

The other thing is that you need to find your "tribe". People who are like minded but have varying interests than you. This is very important. If you want to find out how to meet these people, then you need to start travelling and going on adventures. There is a private realm where the most incredible things happen if you have the right mind to seek it out. Taking risks, entering the danger zone. Faking it til you make it etc. All these things tap into the timing of magickal events that take you to places you could never imagine. It's alchemical to behave this way.

I would say that if you are alone, then you need to travel so you can find yourself through others. You can't be found alone. As infants we can't be. That should be a sign that you need others to have a healthy metabolism.
#9
(02-27-2017, 07:55 PM)VoS Wrote:
(02-27-2017, 05:49 PM)mahounie Wrote: Yeah I think there are very few people that could provide "positive" energy. Charles Bukowski use to suggest to people who are feeling down to lock themselves up for three days. He would come out "totally enlightened" and in good mood everytime.

Well, yes, but Bukowski loved cats, no? And spent a good part of his life in bars? We should probably ask our resident expert here, our own Bukowski

Myself, I feel positive energy when I'm around people who tend I think to have high metabolic rates. Warm hands, warm heart. 

The danger for me arises in being trapped or "helpless" with typically older people who are authoritarian. Cold as ice. And yes, there, I do try to leave myself an exit at all times.

Well he preferred cats to dogs because they would not take training and orders so easily (thus had more 'style', dogs reminded him of most humans). He mostly lived in cheap rooms alone with cockroaches, mice and beer bottle, going from city to city. Being dead was better than being dead while living. 

He felt that a city was a organism of a kind and the energy there would be where the streetwalkers were and the bottles were flying, not in office buildings and rarely in books. I think he really liked only one bar one time in Philadelphia.

He also played horses. The betting market was a way to keep you straight. There's nothing like active market to punish you on your illusions and bullshit. There has been many more geniuses involved in gambling, trading of goods of all kind and speculation than spirituality, philosophy and health business, its just dead shit mostly. There I said it. You remember someone else that was in to it, Alex from Peatarian.com 

Im not really in to analyzing what someone did or didnt do and if someone should follow anything based on that, do what makes you feel. Just that this relates to energy, anarchism and "learned helplessnes". And its not just love, kindness, nutrition and singing kumbaya together at the bonfire...

[video=youtube]https://youtu.be/Sx5uFG28BFE[/video]
#10
(02-28-2017, 11:29 AM)mahounie Wrote:
(02-27-2017, 07:55 PM)VoS Wrote:
(02-27-2017, 05:49 PM)mahounie Wrote: Yeah I think there are very few people that could provide "positive" energy. Charles Bukowski use to suggest to people who are feeling down to lock themselves up for three days. He would come out "totally enlightened" and in good mood everytime.

Well, yes, but Bukowski loved cats, no? And spent a good part of his life in bars? We should probably ask our resident expert here, our own Bukowski

Myself, I feel positive energy when I'm around people who tend I think to have high metabolic rates. Warm hands, warm heart. 

The danger for me arises in being trapped or "helpless" with typically older people who are authoritarian. Cold as ice. And yes, there, I do try to leave myself an exit at all times.

Well he preferred cats to dogs because they would not take training and orders so easily (thus had more 'style', dogs reminded him of most humans). He mostly lived in cheap rooms alone with cockroaches, mice and beer bottle, going from city to city. Being dead was better than being dead while living. 

He felt that a city was a organism of a kind and the energy there would be where the streetwalkers were and the bottles were flying, not in office buildings and rarely in books. I think he really liked only one bar one time in Philadelphia.

He also played horses. The betting market was a way to keep you straight. There's nothing like active market to punish you on your illusions and bullshit. There has been many more geniuses involved in gambling, trading of goods of all kind and speculation than spirituality, philosophy and health business, its just dead shit mostly. There I said it. You remember someone else that was in to it, Alex from Peatarian.com 

Im not really in to analyzing what someone did or didnt do and if someone should follow anything based on that, do what makes you feel. Just that this relates to energy, anarchism and "learned helplessnes". And its not just love, kindness, nutrition and singing kumbaya together at the bonfire...

[video=youtube]https://youtu.be/Sx5uFG28BFE[/video]

Do you find that the isolation tendencies can be serotonergic in nature? I find they can be blocked at least temporarily with cannabis, microgram dose lysergic derivatives, or high dose progesterone, you?

Thanks very much for bringing Charles Bukowski to the fore. i was hoping to goad our Bukowski to join in, alas. You carried the flag well. 

Here's a description of the drinks and drugs he is reputed to have consumed, along with some observations Bukowski had on nutrition, that to me seem almost Ray-Peat like:

Quote:In the early days in Philadelphia, he claimed he would open and close the bar. I suppose you could estimate if he drank throughout the day what that might be approximately. While he wrote Post Office, I believe he said he would drink two six packs and a pint of Cutty Sark. During his later years, a typical writing session would be two bottles (sometimes three) of good German white wine (references to Bernkastel start to appear in the letters)

What isn't clear to me is what the weekly intake was during various periods. Perhaps someone else would know here. John Thomas says they took dexaml, LSD, Dexadrine as well as DMT (the alkaloid in ayahuasca or yage (the powerful hallucinogenic plant from the Amazonian rainforest which William Burroughs was fond of). Vodka and Seven-Up.

There's an interesting passage on beer in a 1971 interview:

"Miller's is the easiest on my system but each new batch of Miller's seems to taste a bit worse. Something is going on there I don't like. I seem to be gradually going over to Schlitz. And I prefer beer in the bottle. Beer in the can definitely gives off a metallic taste. Cans are for the convenience of storekeepers and breweries. Whenever I see a man drinking out of a can I think, now there is a damn fool. Also, bottled beer should be in a brown bottle. Miller again errs in putting the stuff into a white bottle. Beer should be protected both from metal and from light.

Of course, if you have the money it's best to go up the scale and get the more expensive beers, imported or better-made American . Instead of a dollar 35 [SIC] you have to go a dollar 75 or 2 and a quarter and up. The taste is immediately noticeable. And you can drink more with less hangover. Most ordinary American beer is almost poison, especially the stuff that comes out of the spigots at racetracks. This beer actually stinks, I mean to the nose. If you must buy beer at the racetrack it is best to let it sit for 5 minutes before drinking it. There is something about the oxygen getting in there that removes some of the stink. The stuff is simply green.

Beer was much better before world war 2. It had tang and was filled with sharp little bubbles. It's wash now, strictly flat. You just do the best you can with it.

Beer is better to write with and talk with than whiskey. You can go longer and make more sense. But beer is fattening, plenty, and it lessens the sex drive. I mean both the day you are drinking it and the day after. Heavy drinking and heavy loving seldom go hand in hand after the age of 35. I'd say a good chilled wine is the best way out and it should be drunken (drank) slowly after a meal, with just perhaps a small glass before eating.

Heavy drinking is a substitute for companionship and it's a substitute for suicide. It's a secondary way of life. I dislike drunks but I do suppose I take a little drink now and then myself. Amen."
My avatar: William Blake, Vision of Strength
[img]http://i.imgur.com/7sD2Hod.jpg[/img]
  


Forum Jump: