Mushrooms
#21
I like mushrooms, didn't notice any problems, smelly gas I got when I ate lots fruits.Thought that dairy will cause problems too, but not.
#22
(11-29-2016, 12:25 AM)tastyfood Wrote: Have you read Peat's mushroom newsletter? More importantly, what's your experience with this food? 

I've been cooking a pound every night and it gives me glorious bowel movements.

They boost immune health too [1] [2] [3].
Can fight cancer [4] [5].
Reduce inflammation [6] [7] [8] [9].
#23
Do you guys think mushroom broth carries the same immune boosting and anti-cancer effects as whole mushrooms? I ask because I was thinking about how their fiber really sweeps out the intestines and wondered if this is part of the reason for their positive effects.

When looking at the links Area-1255 posted, I was reminded that one of the herbal formulas I took over the spring and summer for my kidneys and bladder contained Cordyceps. It's only after I started taking it that my kidneys began filtering daily. I need to get back on the herbs.
"One regret, my dear world, that I am determined not to have when I am lying on my deathbed is that I did not kiss you enough." ~ Hafiz
#24
(12-21-2016, 01:23 AM)Jennifer Wrote: Do you guys think mushroom broth carries the same immune boosting and anti-cancer effects as whole mushrooms? I ask because I was thinking about how their fiber really sweeps out the intestines and wondered if this is part of the reason for their positive effects.

When looking at the links Area-1255 posted, I was reminded that one of the herbal formulas I took over the spring and summer for my kidneys and bladder contained Cordyceps. It's only after I started taking it that my kidneys began filtering daily. I need to get back on the herbs.
I have the mushroom newsletter which I'd be happy to send to you, J. if you PM me. Here are some excerpts:

Quote:Living in decaying organic matter, the mushroom mycelium is exposed to a great variety of bacteria and other fungi. Animals have to deal with a similar microbial situation in their intestines. Even though our internal exposure to microbes and their products isn't very massive, it can have fatal consequences, as explained by Metchnikoff. The success of mushrooms in dealing with their microbe-rich environment can help us to understand our own problems of "immunity," the processes involved in maintaining the integrity of our organism.

The theory that our immune system consists of mechanisms for distinguishing "self" from "other," and destroying the "other," is being replaced by the "danger theory" of Polly Matzinger and the "damage" or "morphostasis" theory of Jamie Cunliffe. Cunliffe argues that it is the disturbance of our organismic integrity that activates the immune process, not an abstract "otherness." Fungi effectively maintain their integrity without the cellular complexities involved in our multilayered immune system.


 

   Much of the thinking about the medicinal use of mushrooms has focussed on the identification of factors that stimulate our immune system, for example by activating cytokines that increase our production of killer cells. The polysaccharides, betaglucans have had the most attention, as activators of the immune system and for use in cancer chemotherapy, for their direct toxicity to cancer cells. Unfortunately, activation of the immune system involves inflammation, and inflammation generally contributes to the loss of organismic integrity.

 

    Rather than looking for "drugs" in mushrooms, I think we should be trying to understand the nature of their resistance to potential pathogens, and thinking analogically--can their effects such as preventing cancer result from biological features that we have in common with them?

 
    Cell water behaves differently when cells are functionally stable or unstable, being more mobile in cells that are unstable. Substances that act on cell water can modify the stability of the cell. Estrogen, histamine, and nitric oxide increase the "structural temperature" of water, destabilizing the cell, and progesterone, cholesterol, oxygen and carbon dioxide have opposing effects. Several substances in mushrooms probably function as stabilizers, protecting them from destabilizing factors produced by potentially pathogenic bacteria. There is evidence that some of those factors are similarly effective in animal cells, which could explain the wide range of their protective effects.

Trehalose, a disaccharide like sucrose, but chemically more stable, is one of the main sugars of 
mushrooms, and it has similar stabilizing effects on cell water. (In the blood and other extracellular fluids, it reduces glycation and lipid peroxidaton.) 
 
The fungal sterol, lanosterol, which is very similar in structure to cholesterol, can reverse protein aggregation in cataracts (Zhao, et al., 2015), and a 
mushroom extract (containing a variety of related sterols) can prevent the formation of cataracts in vitro (Ganeshpurkar, et al., 2011), preventing the proteins from becoming insoluble, and in living animals the extract reduced cataract formation by 75% (Isai, et al., 2009). Mushrooms have been found to improve learning in animals, and to decrease symptoms of dementia in people (Wang, et al., 2012, Seo, 2010, Mori, et al., 2009).

Estrogen has excitatory, anti-GABA effects in the brain (Smith, et al., 2000, Gu and Moss, 1996), and some of the mushrooms' protective effects result from inhibiting aromatase, the enzyme that synthesizes estrogen (Chen, 2002, Chen, et al., 2006), and also from blocking estrogen receptors  (Jang, et al., 2015, Jiang, et al., 200. Enzyme studies show that a variety of molecules in the common white button mushroom contribute to these anti-estrogen effects, and inhibit cancer cell growth (Grube, et al., 2001). Studies in mice showed that an extract of these mushrooms inhibited growth and increased apoptosis in human prostate cancer cells (Adams, et al., 2008). The effects of mushrooms on cancer are parallel to those of progesterone, inhibiting a wide variety of cancer promoting mechanisms. One of the major mushroom sterols, ergosterol, has been identified as an anticancer agent (Li, et al., 2015).

 
   Besides the cell-stabilizing trehalose and steroids, mushrooms contain a variety of flavonoids, including some that are found in citrus fruits, such as rutin, luteolin, and apigenin. A high vitamin E content (Vamanu, 2014) might contribute to their anti-inflammatory effects.

The hydrazine-containing toxins that Toth and others wrote about are destroyed by heat. Since extracts made by boiling the mushrooms for three hours were very active, I think it's good to boil them from one to three hours.
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#25
(12-14-2016, 08:12 PM)VoS Wrote: Day 5 of kefir mushroom growing and still only a little growth. I changed the medium, and will keep trying. 

It may take some time for the kefir mushrooms I had been using in dairy to switch over to using sugar instead of dairy. In the meanwhile, I will look around for tibetan kefir mushrooms, that have been raised on sugar water all along.

Update me, please! Any growth spurts yet? Smile
"One regret, my dear world, that I am determined not to have when I am lying on my deathbed is that I did not kiss you enough." ~ Hafiz
#26
(01-24-2017, 02:16 AM)Jennifer Wrote:
(12-14-2016, 08:12 PM)VoS Wrote: Day 5 of kefir mushroom growing and still only a little growth. I changed the medium, and will keep trying. 

It may take some time for the kefir mushrooms I had been using in dairy to switch over to using sugar instead of dairy. In the meanwhile, I will look around for tibetan kefir mushrooms, that have been raised on sugar water all along.

Update me, please! Any growth spurts yet? Smile

No luck. They ferment the sugar water, but they don't grow larger. 

I just happened to find this site about water kefir, which I'll try to study and apply:
https://tibicos.wordpress.com/faq/

I am currently much in love with coconut water. It's expensive but lovely.
My avatar: William Blake, Vision of Strength
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#27
(01-24-2017, 06:42 AM)VoS Wrote:
(01-24-2017, 02:16 AM)Jennifer Wrote:
(12-14-2016, 08:12 PM)VoS Wrote: Day 5 of kefir mushroom growing and still only a little growth. I changed the medium, and will keep trying. 

It may take some time for the kefir mushrooms I had been using in dairy to switch over to using sugar instead of dairy. In the meanwhile, I will look around for tibetan kefir mushrooms, that have been raised on sugar water all along.

Update me, please! Any growth spurts yet? Smile

No luck. They ferment the sugar water, but they don't grow larger. 

I just happened to find this site about water kefir, which I'll try to study and apply:
https://tibicos.wordpress.com/faq/

I am currently much in love with coconut water. It's expensive but lovely.

Aww...bummer! 

I'm glad you're liking the coconut water, though. These days, it's one of the few things Bee will still ingest so it's pretty magical in my eyes. Smile
"One regret, my dear world, that I am determined not to have when I am lying on my deathbed is that I did not kiss you enough." ~ Hafiz
#28
Speaking of the comprehensive stool analysis, does anyome have any opinions on the utility of the test?
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#29
Knowing what I know now, if I had do overs, I wouldn't bother with the comprehensive stool test. It can show us what's going on in our guts, but we can do that with cheap tools and our senses alone. For example, the test can tell you how well you're digesting fat. I can do the same thing just by peeing in a cup and letting the urine sit for a bit. My urine ends up with an oily film at the top. Oily urine indicates a liver/gallbladder weakness and possibly stones (a previous ultra-sound test confirmed I had stones). Another way I can tell is by gallbladder pains, gas and the need to sleep after eating fatty foods like some avocado. Meanwhile, it cost me $500 both times I took the stool test because my insurance wouldn't cover them.

The stool test can also tell you exactly what the microbial terrain of your gut looks like, which microbes are over or under populating it, and which antimicrobials (both herbal and pharmaceutical) are effective at treating any overgrowths you may have, but in my opinion the game plan is still the same. Despite taking high doses of minocycline for roughly 6 months, along with strong herbal antimicrobials, I didn't see a lasting reduction in my overgrowth until I switched to a diet I digest easily and started strengthening specific weakened glands like my liver/gallbladder, and my pancreas and adrenals (both involved in carb metabolism). Before that I was simply treating symptoms, not the cause.
"One regret, my dear world, that I am determined not to have when I am lying on my deathbed is that I did not kiss you enough." ~ Hafiz
  


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