Mushrooms
#1
Have you read Peat's mushroom newsletter? More importantly, what's your experience with this food? 

I've been cooking a pound every night and it gives me glorious bowel movements.
#2
Oh, wow! A pound of mushrooms every night is impressive, tastyfood.

I noticed mushrooms were causing me a lot of bloating so I now limit them, which is a shame because I think cream of mushroom soup is pretty heavenly.
"One regret, my dear world, that I am determined not to have when I am lying on my deathbed is that I did not kiss you enough." ~ Hafiz
#3
(11-29-2016, 02:44 AM)Jennifer Wrote: Oh, wow! A pound of mushrooms every night is impressive, tastyfood.

I noticed mushrooms were causing me a lot of bloating so I now limit them, which is a shame because I think cream of mushroom soup is pretty heavenly.

Did you boil the mushrooms for an hour or more? That's what Ray suggested in the newsletter about mushrooms. If you don't have that newsletter, PM me and I'll send it to you.
My avatar: William Blake, Vision of Strength
[img]http://i.imgur.com/7sD2Hod.jpg[/img]
#4
(11-29-2016, 06:38 PM)VoS Wrote:
(11-29-2016, 02:44 AM)Jennifer Wrote: Oh, wow! A pound of mushrooms every night is impressive, tastyfood.

I noticed mushrooms were causing me a lot of bloating so I now limit them, which is a shame because I think cream of mushroom soup is pretty heavenly.

Did you boil the mushrooms for an hour or more? That's what Ray suggested in the newsletter about mushrooms. If you don't have that newsletter, PM me and I'll send it to you.

I used to boil them for over an hour like Ray suggests, but they still caused this piercing pain and bloating in my lower GI, right near my vaginal area. This is where I always get it when a food doesn't agree with me. Soft fruits, fat and eggs are the only foods that never caused me issues. The worst is dairy, muscle meat and foods higher in insoluble fiber like the mushrooms, whole grains, nuts & seeds (even sprouted), hard peels etc.

I can understand the dairy and meat since I don't digest them well and so they probably fuel an excess of bacteria, but I'm not sure why the insoluble fiber since from what I understand, it isn't fermented by bacteria? The only thing I can think of is I possibly have some intestinal inflammation in that area that is aggravated by the rougher fibers.
"One regret, my dear world, that I am determined not to have when I am lying on my deathbed is that I did not kiss you enough." ~ Hafiz
#5
(11-29-2016, 06:38 PM)VoS Wrote:
(11-29-2016, 02:44 AM)Jennifer Wrote: Oh, wow! A pound of mushrooms every night is impressive, tastyfood.

I noticed mushrooms were causing me a lot of bloating so I now limit them, which is a shame because I think cream of mushroom soup is pretty heavenly.

Did you boil the mushrooms for an hour or more? That's what Ray suggested in the newsletter about mushrooms. If you don't have that newsletter, PM me and I'll send it to you.

Yeah I have it. I boil them for a bit more than one hour until they turn dark.
#6
Mushrooms are high in mannitol so I cannot digest them well for now as my gut microbiota is still a mess.
#7
(11-30-2016, 03:00 AM)Arborescence Wrote: Mushrooms are high in mannitol so I cannot digest them well for now as my gut microbiota is still a mess.

I noticed they come out undigested in my stool. I can even smell them. Is this because they are insoluble fiber, similar to carrots?
#8
That's possible yes. They also come undigested in my gut and bring a bad smell to my stools (VoS said according to Metchnikoff that it is a sign that bacteria produce toxins).
#9
Huh, interesting. Even though mushrooms cause me bloating, my stools are odorless. I've been eating 100% plant-based (mostly fruit) since August of 2015 and I guess it's fairly common to have odorless stools on a fruitarian diet. The diet is easy for me to digest and keeps me very regular so I wonder if those are two of the main factors.

Out of curiosity, do you guys notice smelly stools when you eat carrots or bamboo shoots? Because I wonder if the mushrooms are actually clearing out odor causing bacteria and their byproducts? I usually give up on them after a week or so due to the bloating, but I wonder if it takes a couple weeks to reap their benefits?

I thought that insoluble fibers weren't easily fermented by bacteria and that that's why Ray recommends raw carrot, cooked bamboo shoots and boiled mushrooms, but I think I was getting confused by the classification of non-digestible fibers. I did some reading and I'm more confused than ever because it seems they are fermentable, and there are quite a few different ones, at that.

VoS, do you have any thoughts you can add since you've researched this subject? For gut health, do you think I would benefit more from the coconut kefir or giving it a longer trial run with the mushrooms? I want to experiment with one thing at a time.
"One regret, my dear world, that I am determined not to have when I am lying on my deathbed is that I did not kiss you enough." ~ Hafiz
#10
(12-01-2016, 12:02 AM)Jennifer Wrote: Huh, interesting. Even though mushrooms cause me bloating, my stools are odorless. I've been eating 100% plant-based (mostly fruit) since August of 2015 and I guess it's fairly common to have odorless stools on a fruitarian diet. The diet is easy for me to digest and keeps me very regular so I wonder if those are two of the main factors.

Out of curiosity, do you guys notice smelly stools when you eat carrots or bamboo shoots? Because I wonder if the mushrooms are actually clearing out odor causing bacteria and their byproducts? I usually give up on them after a week or so due to the bloating, but I wonder if it takes a couple weeks to reap their benefits?

I thought that insoluble fibers weren't easily fermented by bacteria and that that's why Ray recommends raw carrot, cooked bamboo shoots and boiled mushrooms, but I think I was getting confused by the classification of non-digestible fibers. I did some reading and I'm more confused than ever because it seems they are fermentable, and there are quite a few different ones, at that.

VoS, do you have any thoughts you can add since you've researched this subject? For gut health, do you think I would benefit more from the coconut kefir or giving it a longer trial run with the mushrooms? I want to experiment with one thing at a time.

Yes, I think that, too. It seems transit time is helped by certain kinds of fiber.  I see this:
Quote:The isoflavones (many of which are now being promoted as “antioxidants” and “cancer preventives”) are toxic to many organs, but they have clear estrogenic effects, and are active not only immediately in the mature individual, but when they are present prenatally, they cause feminization of the male genitalia and behavior, and early maturation of the female offspring, with the tissue changes that are known to be associated with increased incidence of cancer. 

There are interesting associations between vegetable “fiber” and estrogens. Because of my own experience in finding that eating a raw carrot daily prevented my migraines, I began to suspect that the carrot fiber was having both a bowel-protective and an antiestrogen effect. Several women who suffered from premenstrual symptoms, including migraine, had their serum estrogen measured before and after the “carrot diet,” and they found that the carrot lowered their estrogen within a few days, as it relieved their symptoms. 

Undigestible fiber, if it isn't broken down by bowel bacteria, increases fecal bulk, and tends to speed the transit of material through the intestine, just as laxatives do. But some of these “fiber” materials, e.g., lignin, are themselves estrogenic, and other fibers, by promoting bacterial growth, can promote the conversion of harmless substances into toxins and carcinogens. When there is a clear “antiestrogen” effect from dietary fiber, it seems to be the result of accelerated transit through the intestine, speeding elimination and preventing reabsorption of the estrogen which has been excreted in the bile. Laxatives have this same effect on the excretion of estradiol. 
Some of the isoflavones, lignins, and other phytoestrogens are said to prevent bowel cancer, but some of them, e.g., lignin, appear to sometimes increase its likelihood. 

About mushrooms, Ray said this:

Quote:Living in decaying organic matter, the mushroom mycelium is exposed to a great variety of bacteria and other fungi. Animals have to deal with a similar microbial situation in their intestines. Even though our internal exposure to microbes and their products isn't very massive, it can have fatal consequences, as explained by Metchnikoff. The success of mushrooms in dealing with their microbe-rich environment can help us to understand our own problems of "immunity," the processes involved in maintaining the integrity of our organism.


I think the idea is that mushrooms and carrot fiber can even deal with the microbe-rich environment in the gut. 

I try to keep a gut that has no microbes, other than lacto-bacillus families found in kefir. Easier said than done. So when I do have an upset in the gut, then I reach for the well-boiled mushrooms, or the carrot fiber, or the granular activated charcoal.
My avatar: William Blake, Vision of Strength
[img]http://i.imgur.com/7sD2Hod.jpg[/img]
  


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