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What i have done to cure hypo and stay lean.
#11
https://s22.postimg.org/v6e7036n5/20161121_085356.jpg

A link to and updated pic.  they are something like a year apart yet i look almost exactly the same.  thats really interesting to me because i have drastically changed diets over that time, sometimes eating 150g of fat a day and over 3k cals.  in the past i would have gained fat almost overnight.  i remember in the low carb days i was eating around 1600-2000 cals a day and gaining fat. i was at an all time high of 200 when i found Peat/Matt Stone and gained up to 220.

In the lower pic im at an all time low of 163. I honestly couldnt believe that weight when i went to the doc because i had never been under 180 since i was 16. No matter how much i dieted or exercised i could break 170s. In the second pic im around 170.
#12
(11-22-2016, 03:54 AM)Zachs Wrote: https://s22.postimg.org/v6e7036n5/20161121_085356.jpg

A link to and updated pic.  they are something like a year apart yet i look almost exactly the same.  thats really interesting to me because i have drastically changed diets over that time, sometimes eating 150g of fat a day and over 3k cals.  in the past i would have gained fat almost overnight.  i remember in the low carb days i was eating around 1600-2000 cals a day and gaining fat. i was at an all time high of 200 when i found Peat/Matt Stone and gained up to 220.

In the lower pic im at an all time low of 163. I honestly couldnt believe that weight when i went to the doc because i had never been under 180 since i was 16.  No matter how much i dieted or exercised i could break 170s.  In the second pic im around 170.
That looks good, bud. I mostly go by the lower belly and to the eye, it looks like you have little to no bloating. 

But ab muscles actually make it hard to tell what the hidden, visceral fat is underneath. When you lay on your back (with your abs relaxed), can you feel your lower belly pucker up? This tells you how much visceral fat or gut inflammation there is.

Also, do you try to exhale and then hold your breath? How long you can hold your breath (after you exhale) would tell how much CO2 you are retaining, as opposed to hyperventilating.
My avatar: William Blake, Vision of Strength
[img]http://i.imgur.com/7sD2Hod.jpg[/img]
#13
Hey VoS, thanks man.

I practice stomach vacuum a bit and i dont think i really have any fat ubderneith fortunately. If i lay flat on an empty stomach, my stomach is definitely concave.

I just tried the breath thing, i got 21 seconds before i felt the need to breath. Whats a good time for this? Im very concious of my breath. Practice shallow breaths, hardly moving my chest or abdomen. Closed mouth, through nose always with tongue touching roof of mouth.
#14
(11-22-2016, 03:08 PM)Zachs Wrote: Hey VoS, thanks man.

I practice stomach vacuum a bit and i dont think i really have any fat underneath fortunately.  If i lay flat on an empty stomach, my stomach is definitely concave.

I just tried the breath thing, i got 21 seconds before i felt the need to breath.  Whats a good time for this?  Im very conscious of my breath.  Practice shallow breaths, hardly moving my chest or abdomen. Closed mouth, through nose always with tongue touching roof of mouth.

I find it varies relative to my own diurnal stress cycles, which seem to be about 90 minutes. When I'm relatively stress free it might be 40-60 seconds before I first feel the need to breathe, and about 120-150 seconds before I really am forced to breathe. 

But in the more stressful parts of the cycle, I might have only 20-40 seconds for the first urge to breathe, and maybe 60-90 seconds for the maximum breath hold. This seems especially so when first waking after a long sleep, and cortisol feels very high.

There may be a correlation it seems between how empty the gut is and how long the CO2 can accumulate. It seems the more full the gut, the less CO2 can accumulate (the shorter the urge to breathe, and the higher the cortisol). 

Some find diurnal roughly 90 minute cycles that is tied to electrical waves travelling along the gut, and also in sleep. These diurnal electrical waves may be occurring across all life forms. 

Ray Peat has said that the difference between the rationalistic and creative view is just whether one accepts the concept of time. Time may not really exist, apart from electrical waves that travel through life.
My avatar: William Blake, Vision of Strength
[img]http://i.imgur.com/7sD2Hod.jpg[/img]
#15
(11-22-2016, 03:42 PM)VoS Wrote: Ray Peat has said that the difference between the rationalistic and creative view is just whether one accepts the concept of time. Time may not really exist, apart from electrical waves that travel through life.

This sounds very interesting to me. Anyway you can expand on this?
"The true method of knowledge is experiment." -William Blake
#16
(11-22-2016, 06:29 PM)Sea Wrote:
(11-22-2016, 03:42 PM)VoS Wrote: Ray Peat has said that the difference between the rationalistic and creative view is just whether one accepts the concept of time. Time may not really exist, apart from electrical waves that travel through life.

This sounds very interesting to me. Anyway you can expand on this?

Yes, the slow wave sleep that we hear about is a kind of electrical wave. The wave is very steady in what we might "rationally" think of as time. 

But creatively, time may be relative to the wavelength. 

It's like if you were traveling on a spaceship that approached the speed of light, looking at light outside your spaceship window, you would see the wavelength of the light appear to get slower, and time would seem to get slower.

Until when you reached the same speed as the light, the wavelength would appear to stop. And there would be no way to go any faster. Because time itself had stopped.

I picture a similar idea with the electronic wavelength that travels through sleep and the gut of all life forms. Time doesn't really exist, except in a kind of relativity to the wave traveling through us.
My avatar: William Blake, Vision of Strength
[img]http://i.imgur.com/7sD2Hod.jpg[/img]
#17
And they wonder why some of us consider climate change bullshit, ha!
#18
Zachs - In your earlier posts you said you were going to talk about magnesium a bit more, and what you do for magnesium. Would you be able to tell us more? Thanks.
#19
Hey @Zachs, during your Paleo days, did you develop intolerance to certain foods? For example, could you handle well dairy products and even gluten containing foods? Or any food not Paleo?

Also, how was your mental status? This is, did you have symptoms like brain fog, brain fatigue, ADHD, OCD, etc? Or was your mind always sharp even back then?
#20
Good thread.

I too noticed that chocolate, especially dark, was not personally good for me.

Saturated fat is nice.
  
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